What Billionaire George Soros Says We Can Learn From Quantum Mechanics, Francis Bacon, and Our Own Mistakes

George Soros is as active and involved on the world stage as ever. In a recent article by Politico, the fact was highlighted that this octogenarian is still trading in the world market, investing in political movements, and giving voice to his ideas.

The ideas that Soros shares are deep. The political action he takes is well thought out. His ideas and his financial life are strongly correlated. Read more on nytimes.com

George Soros believes that human beings can not attain a state of perfect knowledge. He believes that one of the limitations of being human comes from the uncertainty principal discovered by Heisenberg, a world renown physicist who studied quantum mechanics. Heisenberg found that when man observed an experiment, the experiment was changed due to the observer. This led Soros to develop a world outlook that includes a concept he calls “refelxivity”. This means that at all times, humans deal with a state of being that involves a two way feedback mechanism. Humans are forever altering the reality that they observe. Because of reflexivity, billionaire George Soros believes that humans can never know Ultimate Truth.

This view has guided George Soros to support the concept of open society, in which all viewpoints are accepted. He finds any leader who claims to know truth to be faulty in principle. Soros supports politicians whose leadership will help to create an open society. His philanthropic efforts go towards groups that actively support open society ideals. Last year he gave $5 million dollars to Immigrant Voters Win, and another $ 5 million to Voting Rights Trust. Both groups help to create fair situations for all to vote. They encourage immigrants to vote, and move to lift restrictions and limitations that the conservative party might try to instill. Soros believes that everyone should have an equal right to vote.

Soros’ passion regarding equality and freedom of expression might come from his childhood. He writes that when he questioned his own values, he found, “Having lived through both Nazi persecution and Communist oppression, I came to the conclusion that what was paramount for me was an open society”. In his writing, he describes an open society as one which is open to new ideas, humble, and in which it is understood that no human being knows the ultimate truth. Read this story at Politico about George Soros.

For Soros, politics, the economy, and philosophy blend seamlessly into one. In an essay written for The Atlantic, Soros sites a quote by Francis Bacon as a nugget of wisdom: “Money is like muck, not good except it be spread.” Soros implies that we can learn from Francis Bacon. Money should not be stagnantly hoarded in the hands of the few. It is best spread around equally, in a way that helps the good of all rather than the good of only a small percent.